3 Mental Keys to Being Awesome

 

Coming from a quiet, Midwest upbringing, I was always taught to “never get too full of yourself” or “don’t get too big for your britches.” While I understand that these expressions were well-intentioned attempts to reinforce humility, I always felt them as an admonishment to be compliant and conform.  Most people experienced comparable messages or worse as a child; as over 90% of criticism is negative. Unless you put aside those messages, they will only serve as obstacles on the road to awesome.

Some people dismiss positive affirmation as a pop-psychology gimmick. Executives, managers, and influencers should beware that, unless you consciously dismiss those old messages, they will haunt you for the rest of your career. We have all observed managers that avoid conflict, sales people who hate cold calls, or executives that cannot own a mistake. While these professionals may not consciously recall old messages, emotions will come into play that spurs avoidance, procrastination, or even aggression. These habits of thought can be broken and here are three keys for going forward:

 

Log your dreams and set goals to achieve them. It sounds so simple. Yet, most professionals I know do not set goals. Most of these people are highly productive and competent in their work. A common belief system is that it is an obligation to be highly responsive to the people and events around them. While that’s laudable, such a belief system results in other people and events defining the future.

Improvement requires both learning and letting go. You will never learn something new unless you want to change and believe you are able to learn it. Daniel Goleman, renowned expert on emotional intelligence, began his research by trying to understand why corporate training wasn’t more effective. He found that an overwhelming number of people did not know why they were being sent to the training and most would prefer to skip it. The result was that people returned from training with performance largely unchanged.

Professional athletes spend hours visualizing top performance to improve their performance. In the high-velocity world of professional athletics, athletes must respond intuitively; as there is no time to think. Not so obvious, business professionals face the same challenge. A client or employee speaks to you, and in a millisecond, your body language and facial expression flashes a response before you can even open your mouth. In the business world, responses to stimulus need to be intuitive and preconditioned.

Listening and observing to understand how to speak.

Most achievement is earned through the relationships you form and the level of trust and support you experience in the relationship.  Persuasion and accountability play a large role in recruiting others to support your goals.  In order to recruit someone, you must listen and observe carefully to understand what they want, how they like to be communicated to, and how they like to make decisions. Persuasion is 80% listening and 20% talking.

I will be conducting a class that meets weekly called, Helping People Buy, in Wallingford, CT June 20 to August 22nd. This class will help sales professionals improve their performance by exercising the concepts above. See the link below for more information.

 

Helping People Buy

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More Sales Lessons from the Campaign Trail

patriot flags

Politics is one of my favorite spectator sports; as it brilliantly illuminates the best and worst aspects of our humanity. This month I return to the campaign trail to uncover more lessons in persuasion and perception that can be applied to the sales profession.  The evening news continues to deliver material that’s better than anything I could make up.  So here we go….

They have to buy you before they’ll buy what you sell.  The emerging standoff between Donald Trump and Jeb Bush illuminates a couple points. In August Mr. Trump accused Mr. Bush of being weak. Mr. Trump has upped the ante by refuting Mr. Bush’s assertion that his brother kept us safe after 9/11. In August, Jeb Bush chose not to respond to an attack on his character, and instead, focused his campaign on policy positions. What stuck with the public was “weak.” By forcing Jeb Bush to defend an unpopular chapter in his brother’s presidency, Mr. Trump continued the focus on Mr. Bush’s character and has stymied the Bush campaign’s progress. In sales, it’s important to make a friend and earn credibility before you give your pitch.

Pick your target audience.  The argument whether “George Bush kept us safe” brings up another observation. Safety is a question of how one perceives their immediate surroundings. People who still feel unsafe after 9/11 often feel that the US government failed the country; where people feeling more secure may see a more complex situation and feel Mr. Trump’s criticism unfair. In a Republican primary, Mr. Trump is chasing the “unsafe” group. Sales people and marketers often must take a position that will endear them to one customer group while distancing them from another. Always endear the audience you favor.

Stay clear of emotional landmines. The attack on the World Trade Center is a horrible chapter in American history and we all hold deep memories of that day. By calling out 9/11, Mr. Trump is gambling that his own character will not be called into question.   Sales people are wise to tread carefully when meeting prospects. Recently departed executives, failed product campaigns, and missed promotions are topics that must be discovered and discussed with sensitivity.

Never help the competition sell.  I will never understand why Bernie Sanders excused Hillary Clinton’s email scandal in a public debate while surging in the polls. Between Bernie and the Indianapolis Colts handing over a game to the New England Patriots by lining up in an illegal formation for a fake punt, we’ve had a week where the underdog seemed firmly committed to being an underdog. This can too easily happen when a sales person takes their focus off the sale and needlessly volunteers information that places the competition in a better position. Sales people who believe a technology or product will sell itself can be lulled into complacency.

My caution to the sales community is stay aware and alert or you’ll end up like a politician. As always, please share your observations and comments.

 

Five Missteps that Will Lose a Sale

For many small business owners and entrepreneurs, the passion for their products and services is what inspired them to start their business.  Business owners can be intimidated by selling or tend to oversimplify a high-skill profession. Particularly for businesses that sell products and services to other businesses, it is critical that business owners gain healthy appreciation for selling. What follows is a list of the five most common mistakes I observe with sales people:

  1. Failure to Gain Interest – The first contact with a prospective customer is the most crucial. Executives and buyers today are constantly being solicited to buy products and services. Sales people can differentiate themselves by demonstrating a clear interest in prospects and an understanding of the issues that concern them. The most common error is turning the conversation away from being about the prospect to pitching products.

  2. Chasing Latent Needs – Customers have latent and active needs. Latent needs are problems that the customer recognizes but has insufficient interest in fixing. Sales people are prone to hearing a prospect express a latent need and then using that interaction to qualify the lead. Experienced sales people will probe deeper to understand the value the prospect places on a solution and to see if additional information will change that valuation.

  3. Not identifying all the Influencers and Issues – It is critical to understand who is minding the purse, what that person wants, and who that person listens to when making decisions. Sales people representing consumer products can mistakenly assume that the male half of the couple will make the decision. Executives can have trusted advisors that are not impacted by a purchase, but are called upon for advice. Patience and commitment to understanding the buyer is imperative.

  4. Missing the “want” There are times a sales person will miss discovering what a buyer wants. I have seen instances where executives want to buy the most expensive, glitzy computer or phone; just to send a message about how they want to be seen. An executive looking to retire might be more interested in minimizing change or changes that can make his or her succession happen faster.

  5. No follow up after an order – Like Yogi Berra said, “It ain’t over until it’s over.” With capital goods, there is usually a significant lead time between shipment and the order. Sometimes competitors will see an order as reason to inject a “better and final” offer. This is also the time when suppliers with the better understanding of the “want” can get an upper hand. Be vigilant.

I’d love to hear your comments regarding the lessons you have learned from the competitive world of sales.