Secret to Retaining Young Employees

When the economy heats up, the question of “When will business pick up again?” is quickly replaced with “Where do I find talent?” A number of high-skill industries are struggling with finding younger employees to succeed aging Baby Boomers.  Before companies plan glitzy recruiting campaigns, it is best to make sure their house is in order. Jim Clifton of Gallop wrote, “The single biggest decision you make in your job–bigger than all the rest–is who you name manager. When you name the wrong person manager, nothing fixes that bad decision. Not compensation, not benefits–nothing.” The owner and the management team create the vibe that will attract and retain top performers.

Managers are tasked with bringing positive change to the organization. This is tricky when societal values and consumer preferences are changing at a blinding rate.  Yet, companies too often overlook investment in developing management skill and give a pass to ineffective managers. I believe that managers need to be adept in the following roles:

 

Manager as Coach At a seminar recently, I made the assertion that managers need coaching skills to develop soft skills in sales and management employees. I was surprised to get push back from a participant. There was a concern that if the manager developed close relationships with employees, they might lose objectivity in assessing performance. In my world, close relationships are indeed what we are looking for.  To be a coach, a manager must have clear understanding of the job roles, communicate the desired results for each role, and possess the ability to teach employees required skills to perform the job. If a manager can shift accountability for job performance to the employee, the employee will have a greater sense of achievement and development. Retention of young employees depends on a perception that the company is committed to their development.

Manager as Motivator A successful manager keeps an eye not only on what motivates each employee, but also on what demotivates. Managers need to be skillful at building a level of rapport that permits them to ask appropriate questions that reveal why they came to work for the company and what draws them to perform.  Organizing work assignments and offering recognition that touches those motivators will gain peak performance.

Manager as Leader Whether you are a CEO or first line supervisor, it is vital to have a vision and sense of mission for your organization. The younger generation has little patience with companies that cannot describe a brighter future that will provide opportunities for employees. Positive management values that will build trust and cooperation will shape culture and support the mission.  A question that every business leader should reflect on is whether their managers value, or even like, their employees. Younger workers prefer collaborative work environments that respect their thoughts on systems and work rules. Industries that have been stereotyped as having hierarchical authority and repetitive work assignments need to consider undertaking cultural change.

Manager as Gatekeeper Businesses today need an aggressive, strategic hiring strategy. Managers need to make hiring decisions based on character and skills without compromise. Interviews need to pose questions that discover how the candidate’s values and mission align with the company. A common interview question is “Where do you want to be in five years?”  Strong candidates will have a clear answer to this question. The question for you is, “Can you get them there?”

One Strategy that Will Improve Profitability, Quality, Healthcare Costs…

Gallup ImageWhile perusing a digest on LinkedIn, I came across a link to a Gallup report entitled “State of the American Workplace 2013” (http://bit.ly/1RQ5Bpa to register and download.) This is an informative report that establishes a quantitative value for employee engagement. When measuring employee engagement, the companies in the top quartile reported 22% more profit, 41% fewer defects, and significantly lower healthcare costs than the bottom quartile. Of America’s roughly 100 million workers, 30 million are engaged, 50 million are not engaged, and 20 million are actively disengaged. Actively disengaged workers sabotage, obstruct, and steal to act out their unhappiness and cost the US economy $450 to $550 billion annually. Of the industry sectors measured, manufacturing has one of the lowest levels of engagement, customer service is the job function with the lowest engagement, and Connecticut has one of the highest levels of actively disengaged employees. The bottom line is that an unpopular supervisor may be costing you a lot more than you think.

I encourage all my clients to manage engagement. Per Gallup, engaged employees create most all innovations, win most new customers, and provide the most entrepreneurial energy.  So as we prepare to roll into a new year, here are my top suggestions for improving engagement:

Tie Employee Goals to Vision and Strategy: First of all, make sure you have a vision and strategy that employees can read and understand. All employees realize fulfillment by feeling connected to a mission that is valued by their community. Sense of mission is the most fundamental and necessary element of engagement.

Managers that Motivate and Measure:

It used to be common wisdom to treat all employees equally. Today, great managers recognize the diversity of their team and tailor how they approach team members to satisfy individual engagement needs. For some, a sense of belonging may be essential; for others it might be mission. The ability to connect with employees needs to be balanced, however, with an objective accounting of results and helpful feedback.

Flexible Work Rules:  Employers that accommodate employees’ needs outside of work grow employee engagement. The Gallup data shows that remote workers had higher engagement and worked more hours than in-house employees. Of note, employees who were permitted to work less than 20% of their time remotely had significantly higher engagement scores than both the in-house and 100%-remote employees.

Invest in Employee Development: Anyone under the age of 50 gauges their loyalty to an employer by the employer’s willingness to create opportunity and develop careers.  Millennials comprise over 30% of the workforce today and perceived lack of advancement opportunities is the #1 reason for changing jobs.

This is just a sampling of ideas. Please share any tactics that have worked for you or examples of employers who are great to work for.

Wish you every success in the new year!

 

Avoid Costly Training Mistakes

A survey by The Economist of over 1100 Millennial employees and 150 managers revealed that 91% of Millennials felt they would spend less than three years in a job before moving on.  Noted author, David Burstein, wrote that it is possible that the Millennial generation will have had 14 jobs by the time they are 38 years of age. This attitude will challenge manufacturers and other technology organizations with extensive training programs and depend on employee retention to grow intellectual property and “know how.”

As noted in an earlier blog titled “Overcoming Obstacles to a Younger Workforce,” a clear business strategy and managerial transparency are essential for attracting younger workers. Commitment to executing the strategy, developing employees, and showing how employees support the strategy are critical to retaining them. Having spent most of their lives in a down economy, Millennials evaluate their opportunity for advancement and employer’s commitment to their development more carefully than their elders did. Communicating a clear career path strengthens employee engagement.

When developing a training strategy, it is important to consider how teaching methods have changed over the last couple decades. As a Boomer, I was very comfortable sitting in a lecture hall building a vast reservoir of knowledge before attempting to solve a real problem. Feedback on how I was doing was limited to two, perhaps three, examinations during the semester. Today learning is more focused on problem solving skills and assumes that all the knowledge details can be grabbed as needed off the Internet.  Students are accustomed to two-way feedback all through the learning process.

My suggestions for a positive employee development program include:

  • Structured Orientation – Graduates today starting their first or second job expect some training and orientation. Many organizations lack a resource to plan how an employee is brought into the company. I know from my own experience, there are costs associated with skipping or skimping on orientation.
  • Challenge – Younger workers are more schooled in critical thinking than my generation. There is value to assigning trainees a “real” problem and let them figure it out. Younger workers learn better with on-the-job training. “Spoon feeding” information risks losing the trainee’s engagement.
  • Autonomy – Self-paced training based on interactive technology has many advantages. Letting trainees control the pace assures that they won’t get bored and makes it possible to receive the instant gratification they wish for.
  • Structure the Training Path – The greater the correlation between skill proficiency and compensation, the better. Breaking training into small increments is cost effective for the employer and makes it easier to point to the next step in the employee’s development.
  • Appreciate and Encourage – Young workers are accustomed to receiving far more encouragement and monitoring than older managers are accustomed to delivering. In flat organizations, managers might want to assign peer mentors to trainees if the manager cannot allocate the time.

This may seem counterintuitive, but Don Tapscott wrote that, for managers unclear on how to best train the Millennial generation, task them with the problem. They will appreciate the collaboration and you will be pleasantly surprised by what you receive.  Please share your training successes!

Skills Managers Need for the Digital World

Digital OrgThe successful manager in the digital age will foster innovation and collaboration, respect employees’ desire for work/family balance, and guide workforce development in a rapidly changing landscape. These managers will often cede their place “at the top of the pile” and behave like another node in the organizational network. Managers that rely on authority and structure to achieve organizational goals will frustrate and flounder. Managers with the courage and compassion to lead will thrive.

Our politics, commerce, religion, and increasingly mobile lifestyles demonstrate a decline in highly-centralized institutions and a rise in flatter organizations where decision-making is distributed to gain its full knowledge and expertise. This period of powerful social and technological change are shaping business leaders to have a balanced focus on innovation and quality processes.

With the challenge of bringing change to large organizations, corporate leaders are already sensitive to this “sea change” and are well on their way to adapting. I believe leaders of small and medium-sized business will prosper by growing their skills as described below:

  • More ability to inspire and persuade and less focus on direct and control
  • More ability to extend the length of their planning horizon and less focus on reactive problem solving
  • More ability use a long-term vision and purpose to assess the importance of short-term issues and lead the organization
  • More ability design roles and incentives that foster collaboration and encourage personal leadership and initiative
  • More ability to coach and develop employees so to build their trust and confidence in carrying out responsibilities that the manager might normally hold onto for themselves
  • More ability to match employee responsibilities to their natural skills and less “pigeon-holing” employees by credentials and their entry position in the organization

While many people already associate these skills with exceptional managers, this type of skill development requires persistence and commitment. Small business leaders often have not been afforded an opportunity to develop these skills. Executive coaches can play a role in preparing small business leaders to play in the digital world. This is my vision for future business leaders. I welcome all comments, questions, and differing views.