Overcoming Inaction Epilogue

While I hope everybody picked up one gem from the blog series, I hope even harder that people will see the benefits of acting. It is not uncommon for the Return on Investment for projects I take on to be in “the triple digits” over a one year period. For example:

  • Simply giving sales people a structured process can boost results 30% or much better
  • Writing down a business case wins financing to expand
  • Developing a young leadership team that paves the way for that succession plan you’re itching to execute

These are all straight forward tactics, but they all require a leader to change and lead the change. We all have some instinct to squash personal change, when presented.  My parents came from the Greatest Generation and placed an enormous value on self-reliance. I choose an engineering profession that rewards individual innovation. I wrestled to overcome this modeling and accept that these values are not optimal in a management environment.

There are three major themes that describe resistance to change:

  • Lack of confidence: lacking confidence in skill, process, or market
  • Over-managing: relinquishing control of details undermines authority and creates vulnerability to failure
  • Too much confidence: A belief that current results will continue forever

But amazingly, I find motivation to make a change is even more significant than resistance to change. People need to believe that they can create the future they long for. They also need to cope with objectives that are 100% self-directed. There are no deadlines in creating success.

I would like to end the series with an invitation to speak with me about how you are creating success and the challenges that come with it. I don’t assume that scheduling a talk with me in any way suggests you would want to work with me. And you can pick phone, zoom conference, in-person, or whatever format suits as a platform.  If interested, click the link in the email.

Overcoming Inaction Through Leadership

When I was first promoted to a supervisor, my reports suffered through my zest to do work quickly and perfectly. Through commitment and years of scattered workshops, I changed what came natural. I learned to communicate and collaborate with people different than me. I learned to keep my eye on the goal and not be distracted by good or bad news. I truly know we can choose to be more motivating, constructive, and personable. Without making that choice, you can see the following:

  • Conflict goes unresolved or even festers
  • Lack of collaboration and critical communication among employees; leading to missteps
  • Absenteeism and tardiness is an issue
  • Employees lack initiative out of boredom or fear of rejection

Effective management is always backing up work assignments with communication of a larger view of what the work is to accomplish. Success, in my mind, requires a balance of empathy, concise articulation, and wise use of time. At the end of this post is an opportunity to download a tool to assess how well you manage that balance. But here’s a questionnaire to assess your leadership habits. Each “No” should be regarded as an opportunity to improve.

  • Most of your employees have a healthy level of ambition and seek to grow their responsibilities in the organization
  • When circumstances change, I refrain from directing and invite my employees to collaborate on a way forward.
  • I am approachable and make time on a daily basis to understand employee challenges and recognize accomplishments.
  • I have clear goals and plans for changing my management style and being more productive.

If you answered yes to all the questions, you likely have an energetic and productive work environment. Regardless of how you answered, you can download a download a self-assessment of your management style. You’ll gain insight into how well you control employees and encourage them. Accelerated Achievements has helped both new and experienced managers change their management style score in months and not years; like it did my self-directed improvement. If any of my comments leave triggered questions, let’s talk it over.